SAYYES TO YOLKS

Do you eat just the whites of eggs, havingheard it’s a good way to get more proteinwith fewer calories and less cholesterol?A new study shows you won’t get the fullbenefit of the protein in the eggs that way.The research, published in the AmericanJournal of Clinical Nutrition, found that, toget the biggest effect from the protein ineggs, you need to eat the yolk and thewhite together. In the study, subjectsengaged in resistance exercise, thenate either whole eggs or egg whitescontaining 18g of protein. ‘The ingestionof whole eggs resulted in greater muscle-protein synthesis,’ said lead researcherNicholas Burd. Looks like yolks are back!

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LIGHTEN UP

Every runner knows that body weightaffects their running performance. Theheavier you are, the more energy you needto run at any given speed. As a generalrule, lighter means faster – you run mostefficiently when you’re at the low end ofwhat’s considered a healthy weight andbody-fat percentage. Losing excess bodyfat increases your power-to-weight ratio.It also means you can dissipate heat bettertoo because you have a higher surface-area-to-weight ratio and less insulatingbody fat. For female runners, a healthybody fat level is 12–17 per cent if you’reunder 40, or 15–20 per cent if you’reolder than that.But it isn’t simply a case of the lower thebetter. If you lose too much weight, yourhealth can suffer and your performance willdrop, not improve. The secret to losingweight without compromising yourperformance is to do it gradually. Aim tolose no more than about 0.5kg a week.Anything more than this usually meanscutting calories too drastically, whichmay cause muscle loss.

SAYYES TO YOLKS

LOSE TO WIN

Once you know your target weight (usean online calculator, such as runningtools.com, which will account for your age,gender, weight and current body fat)follow these rules to get to your perfectrunning weight.

SAYYES TO YOLKS

1.REDUCE YOUR CALORIE INTAKE BY AROUND 15 PER CENT

For instance, if you currentlyconsume 2,000 calories a day, reduce thisby 15 per cent to 1,700 calories a day.Logging your food intake and countingcalories (at least once) on an app will helpkeep you on track.

PLAN YOUR CARB

2.INTAKE AROUND YOUR RUNNING SESSIONS

On days when you exercisemore or are more active, you should eatmore carbohydrate to account for theenergy burned. Have most of yourcarbohydrate soon after your run too asit will be more likely to be converted intoglycogen than fat during the six-hourpost-run period. On less active days,reduce your carb intake to a level that givesyou enough fuel for your running but nottoo little to cause fatigue or illness. Forexample, aim to replace half your usualportion of pasta, rice or potatoes with extravegetables. If your energy levels drop andyou’re not running well, increase yourcarbohydrate intake.

3.FOCUS ON THE QUALITY OF YOUR FOOD

Replace highly processedfoods, such as sweets,cakes, biscuits, chocolate and fast foodswith wholesome unprocessed foods.They’re naturally more filling and will helpyou eat fewer calories automatically,without compromising performance.

4.EAT ENOUGH PROTEIN

Protein will maintaincalorie-burning muscle whileyou lose weight. It also helpsto promote satiety, keeping you fuller forlonger, as well as suppressing appetite.Include a source of protein in each of yourmeals and snacks – you’ll feel less hungryand less tempted to snack on unhealthyfoods. Aim for 15–25g per meal.

5.DON’T DEPRIVE YOURSELF

If you overly restrict yourfood intake or ban certainfoods, it’ll increase yourdesire for them and eventually result inovereating when your willpower fails.

FUEL UP

As a runner, the biggest differencebetween your nutritional needs andthose of your non-runner friends isyour higher calorie expenditure. Youburn between 500 and 800 calories perhour running, depending on your pace,body weight and terrain. And if youweigh more than 60kg or are a lessefficient runner, you’ll need moreenergy to cover the same distance.However, burning all those caloriesdoesn’t mean you can eat to yourheart’s content! It’s important to matchyour energy input with your energyoutput to prevent weight gain andimprove your performance. This canbe tricky when you first take uprunning, as you may feel hungrier thanusual. Try to listen to your body andonly put back the calories that youtook out, rather like balancing yourbank account! The good news is that,with regular training, your appetitetends to adjust to your energy needs.To calculate your exact calorie needs,use an online calculator.

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