Wishing You Had a Model Figure For The Party Season? Be Careful What You Hope For

Few of us want to look like the catwalk waifs often used by the fashion industry. Luckily, the increasing popularity for ultra-toned models on certain runways means we have a more realistic and healthy-looking ‘ideal’ to aspire to. Strong and fit, with washboard abs and toned limbs – but still with curves in the right places – this new model army oozes sexiness and confidence, and screams of female empowerment. Yes, we might be envious of their Amazonian physiques, but we’re also full of admiration – the fact that they train hard to achieve and maintain their figures (rather than starving themselves) is inspiring, and instils hope in us that, with a bit of work, we too could look as good! The question is: justF ew of us want to look like the catwalk waifs often used by the fashion industry. Luckily, the increasing popularity for ultra-toned models on certain runways means we have a more realistic and healthy-looking ‘ideal’ to aspire to. Strong and fit, with washboard abs and toned limbs – but still with curves in the right places – this new model army oozes sexiness and confidence, and screams of female empowerment. Yes, we might be envious of their Amazonian physiques, but we’re also full of admiration – the fact that they train hard to achieve and maintain their figures (rather than starving themselves) is inspiring, and instils hope in us that, with a bit of work, we too could look as good! The question is: just how dedicated do you need to be ?

Wishing You Had a Model Figure For The Party Season? Be Careful What You Hope For Photo Gallery



We’ve been shocked by recent confessions from some catwalk faves about the punishing lengths they go to in order to shape up for impending shows, with revelations they work out twice a day for months, stop eating solid food in the weeks before an appearance and alarmingly, reduce their fluid intake in the final days to drop excess water and make muscle definition more pronounced. These models might look the picture of health when they strut their stuff, but how healthy are they, and what damage do these regimes have on their bodies in the long term?We’ve been shocked by recent confessions from some catwalk faves about the punishing lengths they go to in order to shape up for impending shows, with revelations they work out twice a day for months, stop eating solid food in the weeks before an appearance and alarmingly, reduce their fluid intake in the final days to drop excess water and make muscle definition more pronounced. These models might look the picture of health when they strut their stuff, but how healthy are they, and what damage do these regimes have on their bodies in the long term?

Huge pressure

‘Training twice a day isn’t inherently bad for you. Jessica Ennis trains way harder than any model, but she’s seen as a great role model for women,’ reasons top UK PT Dan Roberts (danrobertstraining.com). ‘If it’s your job to be in peak condition – whether as an actress, athlete or model – you sacrifice your time and train hard. But the lack-of-food issue is unnecessary, and has massive health implications. Having a good relationship with food, and eating a nutrient-dense diet, is key if you want the best results long term.’ Unfortunately, models face huge pressure to stay in shape, and some resort to drastic measures to win jobs. But not all, thankfully. While H&F cover model Jacqueline Freeman admits she’s more ‘careful’ with her food the week before a shoot, she believes her role as a fitness instructor and love of exercise is what keeps her trim and helps her avoid extreme regimes.

‘Also, the fact I work as a commercial model means I’m not under pressure to be super skinny. The look I “sell” is healthy “girl next door”, which I maintain through a healthy lifestyle.’ But, she points out, many models – especially those working in underwear and fashion – aspire to unrealistic body images because of what advertisers think the public wants to see.‘Training twice a day isn’t inherently bad for you. Jessica Ennis trains way harder than any model, but she’s seen as a great role model for women,’ reasons top UK PT Dan Roberts (danrobertstraining.com). ‘If it’s your job to be in peak condition – whether as an actress, athlete or model – you sacrifice your time and train hard. But the lack-of-food issue is unnecessary, and has massive health implications.

Having a good relationship with food, and eating a nutrient-dense diet, is key if you want the best results long term.’ Unfortunately, models face huge pressure to stay in shape, and some resort to drastic measures to win jobs. But not all, thankfully. While H&F cover model Jacqueline Freeman admits she’s more ‘careful’ with her food the week before a shoot, she believes her role as a fitness instructor and love of exercise is what keeps her trim and helps her avoid extreme regimes. ‘Also, the fact I work as a commercial model means I’m not under pressure to be super skinny. The look I “sell” is healthy “girl next door”, which I maintain through a healthy lifestyle.’ But, she points out, many models – especially those working in underwear and fashion – aspire to unrealistic body images because of what advertisers think the public wants to see.

New ideals

Fellow H&F cover star and blogger Bailee Roberts (themodelfoodie.com) agrees that the advertising industry is largely responsible. ‘Frustratingly, there are categories for fashion models, plus-size models and fitness models, but there isn’t much demand for healthy “normal” models,’ she says. ‘Why is normal (asFellow H&F cover star and blogger Bailee Roberts (themodelfoodie.com) agrees that the advertising industry is largely responsible. ‘Frustratingly, there are categories for fashion models, plus-size models and fitness models, but there isn’t much demand for healthy “normal” models,’ she says. ‘Why is normal whit a healthy. Toned body, not celebrated more and held up as an “ideal” to attain?’ she asks. ‘If it were, there’d be less pressure on models and the public alike to go to such extreme measures to attain unrealistic aesthetic standards, and we’d all livetoned body, not celebrated more and held up as an “ideal” to attain?’ she asks. ‘If it were, there’d be less pressure on models and the public alike to go to such extreme measures to attain unrealistic aesthetic standards, and we’d all live much healthhier happier lives.

GET AN H&F COVER GIRL BODY SENSIBLY…

With these tips from PT Dan Roberts

Trytobethebestversionofyou and don’t copy other people! Work with your body and have realistic role models in terms of your shape and height.Trytobethebestversionofyou and don’t copy other people! Work with your body and have realistic role models in terms of your shape and height.

Eatwell.Starving your body isn’t a strategy – it’s a disorder. Up your vegetable and protein intake, lower the carbs, and drink lots of water!Eatwell.Starving your body isn’t a strategy – it’s a disorder. Up your vegetable and protein intake, lower the carbs, and drink lots of water!

Liftweights.Strong is the sexy standard for women nowadays, and using weights will help firm you up, drop body fat quickly and really sculpt your shape.Liftweights.Strong is the sexy standard for women nowadays, and using weights will help firm you up, drop body fat quickly and really sculpt your shape.

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